Broadband Sky Hub

Which devices are hogging Sky Wi-Fi on your network?

Devices connected to Sky network
Rooting out bandwidth hogs couldn't be simpler

It’s Saturday night and you’re settling down to watch Star Wars: The Force Awakens for the fiftieth time on Netflix. You sit back and relax as the familiar title crashes onto the screen, the John Williams theme swells, the tedious background history scrolls for ten minutes, the camera pans down across an infinite universe full of excitement and… a buffering wheel appears. What devices are hogging Sky Wi-Fi?

In desperation, you try refreshing the page. Nothing. You reboot your laptop. Still no Han Solo. “Get off the Wi-Fi!” you shout in vain at your Fornite-playing kids and Spotify-streaming partner. “You’re hogging the bandwidth!”

If you’re a Sky customer, however, it’s very easy to see exactly how many devices are connected to your network – before you go on the warpath and switch everything to Flight mode. Here’s how.

First, make sure you’re connected to the Wi-Fi and open a browser window. Type 192.168.0.1 into the address bar (don’t include “www.”) and hit Enter.

You will then be asked for your Sky username and password. If you haven’t changed these (which we’d thoroughly recommend doing), the username will be “admin” and the password “sky”. Alan Turing, eat your heart out.

You’ll then be confronted with the Summary Status page for your Sky router. Scroll down to the “Devices connected to your home network” section and gasp in horror at the rogues’ gallery of connected devices.

Devices hogging Sky Wi-Fi

If your initial reaction is something like “I didn’t know we had ten iPhones” or “why are the Joneses next door using our Wi-Fi to run their smart home?”, it’s high time you changed your password by following our simple guide.

This will boot any unwanted devices off of your network, leaving you to watch Kylo Ren have yet another tantrum in peace.

READ NEXT: What’s the best tech support number for Sky broadband?

About the author

Max Figgett

Max has written for numerous websites and magazines over the years. Whether it’s about ancient hardware or software secrets, no Big Tech Question is too obscure for him to tackle.

Add Comment

Click here to post a comment

Leave a Reply

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

%d bloggers like this: