Broadband

What do the coloured lights on routers mean?

Coloured lights on routers mean
Is your router glowing red, green, blue or even yellow? We know why

Decoding router lights can be tricky: for instance, a solid orange light might mean something completely different from a flashing one – whereas a router that resembles a 1970s dancefloor might actually be working perfectly. Luckily, The Big Tech Question is on hand with the ultimate guide to what the coloured lights on routers mean.

Note this is our summary to what each router light signifies. We include links to in-depth guides for more information, such as what flashing lights mean and how to troubleshoot problems, underneath the bullet points.

BT Whole Home Wi-Fi

lights on a BT Whole Home Wi-Fi

  • Purple: The disc is powering up.
  • Blue: Everything’s working and there’s a good connection.
  • Orange: The disc is at the upper limit of its range.
  • Red: Your disc has no connection to the network.

For more information, read our in-depth guide.

BT Home Hubwhich BT Hub do I have

  • Blue: Everything is working fine.
  • Green: The device is starting up.
  • Orange: The Hub is working okay, but there’s an issue with the internet connection.
  • Red: The broadband’s down and the router’s given up trying to fix it.

For more information and solutions to BT Home Hub issues, read our in-depth guide.

Sky HubSky Hub lights

  • No lights: No power.
  • White: If the power, internet and Wi-Fi lights are solid white, everything’s working as it should.
  • Amber: Your Sky Hub has an issue that can’t be resolved online.

For more information and solutions to Sky Hub issues, read our in-depth guide.

Virgin Media Hubs

Virgin Media Hub 3.0

Lights on Virgin Media HubFrom top to bottom, this is what the Hub 3.0’s lights mean:

  • The base LED: When the Hub is in router mode, the base LED will glow white. When it’s in modem mode, it’ll be pink.
  • The phone light: If there’s an issue with your phone service, this will turn on.
  • The internet light: It will flash green when the Hub is connecting or downloading new software. If it flashes red, there’s a problem with your internet connection.
  • The Wi-Fi light: When you boot up the Hub 3.0, the Wi-Fi symbol light up for two minutes. If it flashes bright red, the Wi-Fi isn’t working

Virgin Media Super Hub 2ac and Super Hub 2

Lights on Virgin Media HubFrom top to bottom, this is what the Super Hub 2/2ac’s lights mean:

  • The Wi-Fi lights: These will blink if everything’s shipshape.
  • The “Ready” light: The third light from the top should be on all of the time – if it’s not, there’s no internet connection.
  • The “Traffic” light: If this is flashing blue, data is being transmitted across your network.

Virgin Media Super HubLights on Virgin Media Hub

  • Power button: 
    • Blue: The Super Hub is in router mode.
    • Purple: The Super Hub is in modem mode.
    • Flashing red and blue: The router is connecting to a device via WPS.

From top to bottom, this is what the other lights on the Super Hub mean:

  • The “Traffic” light: If this is twinkling blue or green, everything’s working.
  • The “Ready” light: This should be on 24/7.
  • The Wi-Fi light: If this is flashing or solid green, the Wi-Fi is working as normal

For more information and solutions to Virgin Media Hub issues, read our in-depth guide.

Google WifiGoogle Wifi

  • Green or white: All is well.
  • Blue: The Google Wifi is carrying out a factory reset.
  • Flashing lights: See the full guide

For more information and solutions to Google Wifi issues, read our in-depth guide.

TP-Link Deco M5TP-Link Deco M5

  • Yellow: The TP-Link Deco M5 is starting up.
  • Blue: The unit is going through the setup process.
  • Green: The router’s connected to the internet and everything’s hunky-dory.
  • Red: Something’s not right.

For more information and solutions to TP-Link Deco M5 issues, read our in-depth guide.

READ THIS NEXT: How do I avoid charges when cancelling Sky broadband?

About the author

Max Figgett

Max has written for numerous websites and magazines over the years. Whether it’s about ancient hardware or software secrets, no Big Tech Question is too obscure for him to tackle.

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