Hardware Smart Home

What does a flashing light on a Chromecast mean?

Google Chromecast
Light show: find out what the Chromecast lights mean

A Google Chromecast is a simple, inexpensive way to get content from a computer or mobile device onto your TV. Whichever version of the Chromecast you have, the device sports a single LED. But what does the light on a Chromecast signify? We explain what it means for every model.

Chromecast (1st Generation)

The 1st generation Chromecast is the rectangular version that is pictured here.

Solid white

Your Chromecast is connected to the network and is ready to go.

Flashing white

The Chromecast is disconnected or needs to be set up.

Flashing red (when updating)

Chromecast is receiving an update and is not available for use. You can use it again once the LED status has turned solid white. Whatever you do, don’t disconnect your Chromecast from the power source whilst it’s this colour!

Flashing red and blank TV screen

If there’s a pulsing red LED light on your Chromecast device and a blank TV screen, try the following, one at a time:

  • Unplug your Chromecast from the power source, wait about one minute, and then plug it back in
  • Try the HDMI extender provided with your Chromecast device
  • Plug your Chromecast into another TV
  • Perform a factory reset

Solid red

There may be an error with your device. Unplug your Chromecast from the power source, wait about one minute, and then plug it back in. If that doesn’t resolve the issue, perform a factory reset.

Chromecast (2nd & 3rd Generation and Ultra)

The 2nd Generation, 3rd Generation and Ultra versions of the Chromecast are all disc-like with an integrated HDMI cable. The 2nd Generation is pictured here.

Solid white

Your Chromecast is connected ready to go.

Flashing white

The Chromecast is disconnected or needs to be set up.

Flashing orange

Chromecast is receiving an update and is not available for use. You can use it again once the LED status has turned solid white. Again, don’t disconnect your Chromecast from the power source whilst it’s this colour!

Flashing orange and black TV screen

If there’s a pulsing orange LED light on your Chromecast device and a blank TV screen, try the following, one at a time:

  • Unplug your Chromecast from the power source, wait about one minute, and then plug it back in
  • Use the HDMI extender provided with your Chromecast device
  • Plug your Chromecast into another TV to see if the problem persists
  • Perform a factory reset

Solid orange

There may be an error with your device. Unplug your Chromecast from the power source, wait about a minute, and then plug it back in. If that doesn’t resolve the issue, perform a factory reset.

Chromecast with Google TV

Chromecast with Google TV has a separate remote for controlling the output.

Solid white

Your Chromecast is connected to the network and is ready.

Solid white (dim)

The Chromecast is in an idle state.

Flashing white

The Chromecast is disconnected or needs to be set up.

Alternating pulsing white and orange

Chromecast is receiving an update and is not available for use. You can use it again once the LED status has turned solid white. Do not disconnect the device while it’s flashing white and orange.

Flashing orange

Chromecast is performing a short self-diagnostic check and is temporarily unavailable.

Flashing orange and then turns white after a few seconds

Chromecast is being, or has just been, reset.

Chromecast Audio

Chromecast Audio looks like a 2nd Generation Chromecast in appearance but is distinguished by its yellow cable.

Solid white

Your Chromecast is working fine and ready to go.

Flashing white

The Chromecast is disconnected or needs setting up.

Flashing orange

Chromecast is receiving an update and is not available. Wait for the LED to turn solid white and do not disconnect the device.

Solid orange

There may be an error with your device. Perform a reboot on your device by unplugging it from the power source, wait about one minute, and then plug it back in. If that doesn’t resolve the fault, try a factory reset.

About the author

David Artiss

Currently working for a technology company based in San Francisco, David has worked in IT for nearly 30 years. He is a keen gamer and happily admits to being a gadget nerd too.

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