Windows

Windows 10 says “The processor isn’t supported for Windows 11”. Can I still install it?

Windows 11 System Requirements

If Windows 10 is telling you “The processor isn’t supported for Windows 11”, don’t panic – we’ll show you how to bypass the restrictions and complete the installation.

The CPU and TPM requirements to upgrade to Windows 11 are catching a few people out. Unlike previous operating systems, Microsoft is enforcing a fairly strict dress code on the Windows 11 party. Microsoft has published a list of requirements, but if your machine doesn’t hit it, then we’ve got a solution to get you from Windows 10 to Windows 11.

I’m going to guide you through two setup routines and show you some super simple ways to bypass Windows 11’s checks for CPU, TPM and a few other gotchas. First, we’ll upgrade from Windows 10 on a machine with an incompatible Intel 6th Generation CPU. If you have something older, I’ll do a fresh installation of Windows 11 on a 1st Generation Intel i3 M350.

Before we begin, I need to make Microsoft’s position clear if decide to proceed with our bypass tweaks:

“The PC doesn’t meet the minimum system requirements for running Windows 11 – these requirements help ensure a more reliable and higher quality experience. Installing Windows 11 on this PC is not recommended and may result in compatibility issues. If you proceed with installing Windows 11, your PC will no longer be supported and won’t be entitled to receive updates. Damages to your PC due to lack of compatibility aren’t covered under the manufacturer warranty. By selecting Accept, you are acknowledging that you read and understand this statement.”

Read that? Still here? Cool! Let’s begin.

Version 1: Upgrading from Windows 10 with an unsupported processor.

Step 1: Modify the Windows Registry

Windows 10 says The processor isn't supported for Windows 11
Select Windows PowerShell (Admin)

Right-click on the Start Button in the bottom left-hand corner (or press Windows Key + X) and select Windows Powershell (Admin) from the menu.

Type the following command, pressing enter at the end:

REG ADD HKLM\SYSTEM\Setup\LabConfig /v BypassTPMCheck /t REG_DWORD /d 1
Windows 10 says The processor isn't supported for Windows 11
Windows 11 TPM Bypass

If Powershell doesn’t print The operation completed successfully, then double-check your spelling and spacing.

Windows 10 says The processor isn't supported for Windows 11

This command adds an entry to the registry, BypassTPMCheck. You can probably guess what this does.

The process needs to be repeated to bypass the CPU check. Type the following command, pressing enter at the end:

REG ADD HKLM\SYSTEM\Setup\LabConfig /v BypassCPUCheck /t REG_DWORD /d 1 /f
Windows 10 says The processor isn't supported for Windows 11
Windows 11 CPU Bypass

Windows 11’s strict requirements may scupper your installation chances in other ways. Fortunately, we can easily overcome the 4GB RAM and 64GB storage limit, as well as the requirement for Secure Boot. If required, use these commands in the same way:

REG ADD HKLM\SYSTEM\Setup\LabConfig /v BypassRAMCheck /t REG_DWORD /d 1
REG ADD HKLM\SYSTEM\Setup\LabConfig /v BypassStorageCheck /t REG_DWORD /d 1
REG ADD HKLM\SYSTEM\Setup\LabConfig /v BypassSecureBootCheck /t REG_DWORD /d 1
Windows 10 says The processor isn't supported for Windows 11
Windows 11 other bypass options

Close Powershell. Next time you try to install Windows 11, your machine will bypass these checks.

Step 2: Start the Windows 11 installation.

To complete the process, visit our guide at How do I install Windows 11 from a USB stick? and follow Stage 1. Alternatively, visit the Windows 11 Media Creation Page and download the ISO file.

Windows 10 says The processor isn't supported for Windows 11
Setup.exe to begin Windows 11 setup.

Run setup.exe to begin the process and after a few minutes Windows 11 setup will begin.

Windows 11 setup begins.

Click Next. The installer will check for a few updates and perhaps re-start the setup procedure a few times.

Windows 11 – bypassing TPM & CPU.

The PC checks will begin and the registry adjustments which you’ve introduced will take you straight to the next stage.

Windows 11 requirements bypassed.

Check that both options have ticks, then press Install.

The Windows 11 Desktop, Big Tech Question version.

Depending on the speed of your machine, the installation will take a little while, but after answering a few straightforward setup questions from Microsoft, Windows 11 will be ready to go.

Version 2: Clean installation on a blank hard drive.

An alternative method is to perform a clean installation of Windows 11. If you’ve turbo-charged an old machine with an SSD, this is a great way of extending the life of older hardware (if that sounds good, have a look at our guide to find the perfect SSD upgrade for your machine).

This method is extremely simple to perform and is almost identical to our How do I install Windows 11 from a USB stick? This time we need to make a small intervention during the setup to inject the code and bypass the CPU and TPM requirements.

Windows 11 Setup Screen

Follow stage 1 of that guide to create a bootable Windows 11 USB stick (anything above 8GB will be fine). Boot your PC with the USB stick inserted. On a fresh drive, the machine should find the files on the USB stick, but if it continues to look in the wrong place then pressing F2, F8, F12 or DEL during the startup procedure should bring up a boot selection menu.

At this screen, press Shift + F10 to open a DOS box. Type this code into the box and press enter:

REG ADD HKLM\SYSTEM\Setup\MoSetup /v AllowUpgradesWithUnsupportedTPMOrCPU /t REG_DWORD /d 1
Press Shift + F10 to open the DOS Box

Press Next and the installation will continue as normal. If you’d like more guidance on the installation procedure, take a look at Stage 2 of this guide.

Windows 11 on an Intel i3 M350

We’ve shown you how to bypass the restrictions if Windows 10 reports that The processor isn’t supported for Windows 11.

As we’ve mentioned, Microsoft has stated that it may not support these types of setups with updates, so think carefully before using it as the basis for your main machine. However, for a little bit of tinkering or a hobby project, it’s a great way of extending the useable life of your hardware whilst having a play with Microsoft’s newest OS.

READ NEXT: Where has Cortana gone in Windows 11?

About the author

Lee Grant

I can normally be found attacking things with screwdrivers in my small computer repair business or writing a column for PC Pro magazine.

I am also trying to solve a mystery involving David Bowie.

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